Episode 40: A Dentist's Guide To Teeth Whitening

We're back for another episode of Beauty IQ Uncensored, brought to you by Adore Beauty. 

What’s on this episode? We’re glad you asked...

Ear Infections

Did you know there's such a thing as airplane ear? Neither did we! Jo and Hannah share their worst travel ear infection stories. Hannah continues to manifest her dream of moving to Thailand and Jo shares an awkward travel story involving an ex-boyfriend.

If you suspect you have an ear infection we don't recommend DM'ing Jo on Instagram, please head to your local GP.

Teeth Whitening 

Dentist Madeleine Duff joins us to discuss all things teeth whitening, and we learnt a new dentistry term: "Zingers". We also learnt that even dentists drink red wine through a straw.

Hannah, of course, orders her whitening syringes on Amazon, but you can get yours from your local dentist. 

You can follow Madeleine on Instagram or in person at Toorak Fine Dentistry.

Products we didn't know we needed:

Jo: Compagnie De Provence Hand Cream Shea

Hannah: IT Cosmetics Bye Bye Pores

You can watch Hannah's YouTube video here.

Read our disclaimer here.

Hosts: Joanna Fleming & Hannah Furst

Guests: Madeleine Duff

Jo and Hannah share their worst travel ear infection stories. Plus! Dentist Madeleine Duff joins us to discuss all things teeth whitening

Beauty IQ Uncensored Episode 40 Transcript - 'A Dentist's Guide To Teeth Whitening'

 

Hannah Furst:
Welcome everybody to Beauty IQ the podcast.

Joanna Fleming:
I'm your host, Joanna Fleming.

Hannah Furst:
And I am your co-host Hannah Furst.

Hannah Furst:
I literally have become the most disorganized podcast host on the planet.

Joanna Fleming:
You do like our episode notes that we work off every week.

Hannah Furst:
And I sometimes look at them at a minute before the...

Joanna Fleming:
So I'm like been planning episodes for weeks and you just rock up and you're like, "Oh yeah, cool. That's what we're doing today."

Hannah Furst:
I usually think about like, what can I say that's going to be really gross. That's the extent of my plan.

Joanna Fleming:
And you usually nail it.

Hannah Furst:
Thank you. Thank you. You wouldn't know that I don't know what's going on.

Joanna Fleming:
No, definitely not. So what are we talking about today then? Since you're across it.

Hannah Furst:
I've just got it in front of me. So on today's episode, we are talking about ear infections and we're talking about teeth whitening with a dentist. And then of course the products that we didn't know we needed, and I haven't even filled mine out yet.

Hannah Furst:
If you're a GP that listens to this podcast, we actually [crosstalk 00:00:01:07]...

Joanna Fleming:
Can you hit us up?

Hannah Furst:
Can you hit us up because we're looking for like, call a GP, when we've got personal questions about medical issues. We were looking at like all the local doctor kind of like influences or the influential doctors on like social media and we went into such a rabbit hole.

Joanna Fleming:
We got into a bad place.

Hannah Furst:
I know. It's like, what am I doing? Okay, listen to what Jo wrote to me on Slack. Let me just get it. So Jo goes, "Why did we go down that rabbit hole?" I said, "I have no idea." She goes, "And we talk about our bum holes on a podcast for a living." And I was like, "I know," and we were like, "These doctors are doing so much good in the world and we're just talking about our bum holes."

Joanna Fleming:
I always think that. I honestly always think that.

Hannah Furst:
Oh my God.

Joanna Fleming:
I hope we're improving someone's life by being here.

Hannah Furst:
Hopefully. Hopefully. If anyone's a doctor... To be honest, I've had quite a few GPs message me on Instagram now that I think about it.

Joanna Fleming:
About what?

Hannah Furst:
I think they've listened to something on the podcast.

Joanna Fleming:
I thought you meant prospective husbands.

Hannah Furst:
No, got all women actually. Like they love the podcast, so.

Joanna Fleming:
Oh, well surely there'll be heaps that'll hit us up then.

Hannah Furst:
I think that this shout out will do the job, actually.

Joanna Fleming:
Yeah, we'll be able to find one. I think.

Hannah Furst:
So look, today we're talking about ear infections from a personal point of view.

Joanna Fleming:
Yes.

Hannah Furst:
Because we were wondering why we both got ear infections on holidays.

Joanna Fleming:
Yeah. So I obviously had to look it up and do my own research.

Hannah Furst:
Dr. Joanna.

Joanna Fleming:
Dr. Joanna is here, I have no qualifications. So apparently there's a thing called airplane ear. Did you know that?

Hannah Furst:
No, I didn't.

Joanna Fleming:
Okay. So this happens apparently when the air pressure in your middle ear and the air pressure in the environment don't match. So this can prevent your ear drum from vibrating normally, and then that can cause issues with regulating air pressure in your ear. So that can happen on flights. I don't think it necessarily indicates that it is linked to getting an ear infection, but according to the Mayo Clinic an ear infection can happen when bacteria or virus gets into the middle ear and that's often caused from another illness, like a cold or flu or allergy. And then that causes congestion and swelling in the nasal passages throat, and some kind of tube that I cannot pronounce.

Hannah Furst:
So this really makes sense because I get, whenever I travel, I get tonsillitis. I'm prone to tonsillitis, but I'm not prone to ear infections and I've had a pretty severe ear infection on holidays in Thailand of course.

Joanna Fleming:
So have I.

Hannah Furst:
So let's hear yours first. What happened?

Joanna Fleming:
Okay. So I was in America and I started to get a bit of a cold and I was like, "Oh, I'm feeling really like, I feel worse than I normally would when I had a cold. So, I got through like most of the trip and then we were flying from LA to Hawaii and I was with my ex-boyfriend and I was so sick on that flight.

Hannah Furst:
You just said, ex-boyfriend, we've never spoken about this before.

Joanna Fleming:
Oh, I'm going to tell a story now which involves him.

Hannah Furst:
Sorry. Okay. All right. Okay.

Joanna Fleming:
So, I was in so much pain with my ears because it's a six hour flight from LA to Hawaii. So we're on this flight. I'm like, "Oh my God, I'm in so much pain. I must have an ear infection," because my ears were so sore. So I'm like trying not to cry. I'm on the window seat. He's in the middle aisle and then there was this American lady on the end seat.

Joanna Fleming:
And I was in so much pain that I had to block out the fact that this lady was hitting on my ex-boyfriend and I could hear it all unfolding, but I was in so much pain that I couldn't address it. And so I'm hearing her going like, "Oh my God, are you a cyclist? Your calves are huge."

Hannah Furst:
Oh my God.

Joanna Fleming:
It was so... It was really funny. I would have found it so much funnier if I hadn't been in so much pain at the time, but I got to Hawaii.

Hannah Furst:
Did she know you were with him?

Joanna Fleming:
I assume so. I think I might've had my resting bitch face on.

Hannah Furst:
So she didn't know you were together?

Joanna Fleming:
Yeah. No. I don't know. But then she was like trying to like tease something up when we got to Hawaii and I was like, "Wait, what the hell is going on?"

Hannah Furst:
Oh my God.

Joanna Fleming:
Anyway, we got to Hawaii, I was really sick for most of the time that I was there. Couldn't go into the beach because I obviously couldn't get water in my ears. So I went to the doctor and everything when I got there, but I had to go on antibiotics for it, which I'm sure you probably did as well if yours was as bad.

Hannah Furst:
I was in Thailand, obviously.

Joanna Fleming:
Obviously. Yeah. Where else would you be?

Hannah Furst:
Where else would I be? Soon I'll be leaving there if my manifestations come true. Just joking, Jo. I'm not going anywhere.

Joanna Fleming:
I mean, look, we're recording remotely now, I don't see why we couldn't do it if you're in Thailand.

Hannah Furst:
Imagine if you called me and I was in Thailand and you were like every time that you call me, you could hear the beach in the background.

Joanna Fleming:
Yeah, be pretty annoying. Yeah.

Hannah Furst:
But anyway, so I'm in Thailand and I go to the same place that you can only get there by boat. So my ear, it just got worse and worse progressively got worse until I could not hear out of my ear. Literally couldn't hear anything out of it. So...

Joanna Fleming:
Isn't it weird? It makes you feel so funny like not being able to, when it's so blocked and you just feel completely like it's almost, it makes you dizzy.

Hannah Furst:
It was like, my body was just producing so much wax. I don't know what was going on. Honestly, I don't know what was going on, but I thought it was just a blocked ear. So I ended up going back to the main island to go to a doctor and if you've been to Koh Phangan, like they've got like lots of little clinics around the island because obviously Full Moon Party happens there.

Hannah Furst:
So I went back, went to a clinic, the doctor, he had a look into my ear and they had to flush it out. So I'm lying down and they've got like two nurses trying to flush it out. It took so long. There was, they showed me, I can't even describe to you like what came out of that ear.

Joanna Fleming:
Oh my god. What was it?

Hannah Furst:
It was horrific. Like so much wax.

Joanna Fleming:
I'm getting tingles.

Hannah Furst:
I know. Anyway it was infected. They gave me antibiotic drops.

Joanna Fleming:
To put in the ear.

Hannah Furst:
To put in the ear after I'd had them flushed out. But it got to that point that I couldn't hear anything anymore.

Joanna Fleming:
Yeah. I can't remember the last time I got an ear infection apart from that time.

Hannah Furst:
Yeah, I only get them when I'm traveling.

Joanna Fleming:
Yeah. I mean, I always get sick when I travel, like I'll get tonsillitis or something. When I was in Europe, I had tonsillitis. I feel like traveling just is a breeding ground for germs.

Hannah Furst:
Well, lucky us, we won't be traveling anytime soon.

Joanna Fleming:
Lucky we're not going anywhere.

Hannah Furst:
So, lucky for us that it's over apparently until, well, I actually don't know. I check back every day.

Joanna Fleming:
Do you?

Hannah Furst:
Oh yeah. I look out when can we travel to Thailand every day.

Joanna Fleming:
I love traveling in Australia. So I'm like as soon as the borders are open, I'm booking a week in Tasmania. So if anyone has any Tasmania recommendations of things to do, please hit me up.

Hannah Furst:
I would love to go and see [inaudible 00:07:57]. Have you been?

Joanna Fleming:
Yeah, same. No, I've never been to Tasmania. So, it's on my list. I feel like you need to do more of Australia.

Hannah Furst:
Yeah, no, I'm going to have to. I'm thinking WA.

Joanna Fleming:
Yes, yes. Do WA or even the NT.

Hannah Furst:
But I've got no one to go with. I'd be going on my own.

Joanna Fleming:
That's so sad.

Hannah Furst:
Everyone I know has boyfriends.

Joanna Fleming:
If we could take leave together [crosstalk 00:08:25]...

Hannah Furst:
I know then we could. If you do have an ear infection or suspect you have an ear infection, we don't suggest that you message Jo on Instagram like you all do for your skin care because I could imagine that happening. They'd like sending photos to Jo, like, "Hey Jo, I've got this ear infection. Can you help me?"

Joanna Fleming:
I'm a GP by default.

Hannah Furst:
Someone actually messaged me on Instagram asking me if the VIRTUE Healing Oil was back in stock and I was like, "I have no idea."

Joanna Fleming:
Did you write back saying, "I am not in customer service. I can't help you with that."

Hannah Furst:
I said really nicely, I was like, "Oh, I don't know. Just reach out to our customer service team." I love that people like personally message me, asking me if things are back in stock. I love that. Anyway, if you suspect you have an ear infection or if you have a blocked ear, please go to your GP or...

Joanna Fleming:
Go back and listen to our ear wax episode.

Hannah Furst:
We have another exciting ear wax special coming up when lockdown is fully over. So we can't wait to...

Joanna Fleming:
We cannot wait.

Hannah Furst:
By the way, how bad have your AirPods been?

Joanna Fleming:
Oh my God, Hannah, I can't even tell you how bad they are. My ears are so waxy at the moment. It's disgusting.

Hannah Furst:
Same.

Joanna Fleming:
Why are we like this? Is this normal?

Hannah Furst:
If a doctor listening can explain why isolation has made our ears more waxy, we would really appreciate it.

Joanna Fleming:
Why is this happening?

Speaker 3:
If you like the sound of any of the products you've heard on today's episode, new Adore Beauty customers can get $15 off their first order with orders over $75. Only valid for first time customers. Brand exclusions and terms and conditions apply. Head to adorebeauty.co.nz/podcast.

Hannah Furst:
I would like to introduce Dr. Madeleine Duff, who is a dentist at Toorak Fine Dentistry. Now we know each other. We've had a D&M at my sister's birthday, didn't we?

Madeleine Duff:
Yes, we did. A long one.

Hannah Furst:
Thank you so much for joining us.

Joanna Fleming:
We've invited you on today to talk about teeth whitening because I recently put a story up on my Instagram and teeth whitening was by far the most requested topic. And then Hannah was like, "Hey, I know this dentist." And I was like, "Perfect, done. She's coming on." So we've touched briefly on teeth whitening with Dr. D in a very, very early episode. But we wondered if you could explain the teeth whitening process in a little more detail, like what's actually happening to our teeth when we whiten them?

Madeleine Duff:
Yeah. So when you have whitening done professionally at a dentist, it's a little bit different to the whitening products that you buy at the supermarket or at the chemist, or even the ones that you get on the Internet. It's actually quite a strong chemical-based reaction. So the idea is that it's either a hydrogen peroxide or a carbimide peroxide without getting too science-y and too technical, but it oxidizes the yellow and the staining in your teeth and brings them to the surface. So, it whitens from the inside out whilst if you were looking at some of the charcoal toothpastes and things like that, they actually just remove staining on the surface. So it's more of a chemical process and a chemical reaction.

Madeleine Duff:
The two main ways that you can do it is one, you come into the dentist and you have the whitening done in the chair. I don't know if either of you girls have ever had that done before.

Hannah Furst:
Yes, I've done it. It's the best.

Joanna Fleming:
Hannah and I've done a lot of teeth whitening.

Madeleine Duff:
Yes. Yeah. And I think once you start, it's pretty addictive once you see the results. So the in chair whitening is great for giving you that quick, bam whitening result. It usually takes only about an hour or an hour and a half. The only downfall with it is it can make the teeth a little bit sensitive. Did you find that at all?

Hannah Furst:
Yes, I did.

Joanna Fleming:
I did.

Madeleine Duff:
Yeah. So we call them zingers. So it's after you've had the whitening, you get this just a bit of a zing or a bit of a shock.

Joanna Fleming:
Yes. I know that feeling. Oh, it's making me cringe.

Madeleine Duff:
Yes. And look, it's not comfortable, but you know, beauty is pain. The actual, that zinging sensation, it doesn't necessarily mean anything nasty for the tooth or any damage to the tooth. Whitening is generally considered very safe. It's more so that when you're having your teeth whitened, the whitening agent actually dehydrates the tooth. So because the tooth's dehydrated, it's just telling you I'm dehydrated and it's zinging. So that's why as the tooth rehydrates over the next couple of days with your saliva, those zings go away.

Joanna Fleming:
Right. That's very interesting.

Hannah Furst:
When I had mine done, which was many, many years ago, I had it done in the chair. It was like the most amazing result and then I had these molds made, which I still have, and I still use to keep the results and that's like worked amazingly for me.

Madeleine Duff:
And they work really, really well. I tell all my patients, if you're going to do the in chair whitening, definitely get the take home trays as well. With the way that the take home trays work is, it means you're in control of the whitening, which is why it's so good years after you can still use them and do the whitening at home. So you just get the whitening gel from your dentist, and then you put a small amount in the trays, pop the trays in and leave them in for half an hour to an hour. And then if you do that consecutively over a couple of days, say you've got an event on the weekend, so if you do it earlier in the week, by the time the weekend comes, your teeth are sort of back and lifted to that original white shade, which is really great. It gives you that autonomy to do it at home.

Madeleine Duff:
The other thing that some patients prefer to do instead of having the whitening done in the chair at all, is they just opt for the take home kit. So they just get those trays straight off the bat, and then we send you home and get you to do that whitening. And that's another really good way to do it because you don't get as much sensitivity and you get to keep the trays.

Hannah Furst:
I would so invest in some of those trays, those trays have been the best thing.

Joanna Fleming:
Hannah, I've got a question for you.

Hannah Furst:
Yeah.

Joanna Fleming:
Where do you buy your whitening stuff from and how long do you leave it in for?

Hannah Furst:
Okay. So I buy them on Amazon and I leave them in overnight and my teeth are so, so sensitive the next day. I probably, you probably don't recommend that at home.

Madeleine Duff:
Do you know what's quite interesting is that if you leave the whitening gel in the tray, usually after two hours, the whitening chemical reaction is over. So it actually won't be doing too much after the two hour point.

Hannah Furst:
Okay.

Madeleine Duff:
So look, some people put them in at night and go to sleep with them on purely just from the point that I think I haven't got time during my waking hours to do it. I mean, the only issue with leaving it in overnight is you could possibly end up swallowing more of it. And if you leave it in for over that extra hour, you're getting that pretty zingy sensitivity. So we usually say to patients, "Do it when you're awake and do it for a bit less time, but do it for more days in a row and then you'll get a better result."

Hannah Furst:
I even did it, did you see my Instagram stories before the wedding, Jo? I did it like the morning of the wedding.

Joanna Fleming:
No, I did not see that.

Hannah Furst:
Yeah, I put them in for like two hours before my sister's wedding.

Joanna Fleming:
I'm not surprised.

Hannah Furst:
So, what are the common causes of staining or dental damage that we may not know of?

Madeleine Duff:
Well, I mean, look, there's obviously the big things. There's red wine, tea, coffee that are just going to cause that staining on your teeth. The other thing that a lot of people don't really realize is if you haven't had a professional clean done for a while, you actually get a build-up of these sort of hard yellow sort of minerals on your teeth. So it's called tartar and that actually can give the appearance of staining. And once you have that on your teeth, coffee, red wine soaks into it even moreso.

Madeleine Duff:
So that's one of the things that a lot of people just go, "I'm going to get whitening trays, try and whiten my teeth and just chuck the trays in." And they won't really do very much because your teeth themselves are covered by a sort of an external layer of staining. So, one of the best things to do is actually just get your teeth cleaned first and then start with a fresh slate. So that's one of the things that can cause staining. Look, the other thing as well is if over time your teeth can become, get little cracks in them. If you've got fillings or composites, I don't know if you've heard of composite veneers.

Joanna Fleming:
Yes. I want them.

Hannah Furst:
Yeah, I hear about it all the time.

Madeleine Duff:
Yeah, they are excellent. But one of the downfalls is, is that they can stain around the edges over time. So there's little things like that and whitening may not necessarily get rid of the staining around the edges of those composites. So it's always, I think, as much as buying things on Amazon is excellent, Hannah, to just make sure that you've had someone cast their eyes over your teeth and say, "Yeah, this will whiten. No, this won't, we need to do XYZ to get you the result that you want."

Joanna Fleming:
So on tooth enhancements, would you call it an enhancement? I don't know, a [crosstalk 00:16:40]... It's something that's kind of temporary or even permanent, like porcelain veneers. Can you use whitening products on that? Or, is it generally you don't recommend doing that?

Madeleine Duff:
Look, the thing is, is that you can put the whitening on there, go for it, but it won't do anything.

Joanna Fleming:
Okay.

Madeleine Duff:
Yeah. Composite and porcelain won't whiten. The only thing that will whiten is your natural tooth structure.

Joanna Fleming:
Okay. So if I do get it, I can't use my whitening strips.

Madeleine Duff:
And that's the really big thing is once you do get your porcelain veneers or your composite veneers, you're committing to that shade. So we often say to people, "Okay, are you happy with the color of your teeth right now? Do you want your composite veneers matched to what you've got right now? Or do you want to whiten your teeth first? Get them to a shade that you like, and then we put the composite or the veneer over the top."

Joanna Fleming:
Right. Okay. Well, Hannah and I both whiten our teeth at home as we mentioned. Hannah gets her stuff off Amazon. I've been using like, HiSmile and Mr Bright and brands like that. They've got like strips and they've got the little trays with the light in them. Are those kinds of products safe to use at home or do dentists cringe when people say that they use them?

Madeleine Duff:
Look, I think it's moreso, with those over the counter products or the ones that you can buy on the Internet. They aren't anywhere near as high a concentration or they're completely different whitening products. So I guess one of the things is you never really know what you're getting if you're just getting it online. So that makes me a little bit wary, but at the same time, they just don't really give the results that the whitening agent that you can get from the dentist does just because we're able to prescribe you a much higher strength than the stuff that they're legally allowed to sell online.

Madeleine Duff:
So and some of the other things that people use, I've had a lot of patients come in and they're using a charcoal whitening toothpaste, or even just your regular Colgate whitening toothpaste. A lot of those are actually just abrasive. So they're kind of like a sandy texture within the toothpaste and so people are brushing and brushing and brushing with this stuff and actually can end up wearing away their enamel because it's just so hard. Our teeth don't like being brushed with hard toothbrushes or anything that's really gritty or sandy. So if you're trying to get those surface stains away, yes, it might lift them, but it could also wear away the enamel and once it's gone, you can't get it back.

Joanna Fleming:
Okay. That's good to know.

Hannah Furst:
That's good to know.

Madeleine Duff:
The other thing as well with those whitening trays that you get online is they're not specifically fitted to your teeth. They're kind of like a dip in the hot water mouth guard. And so when you put the whitening gel in, because it's not sort of clicking in and locking into your teeth, like the ones that say Hannah would have, the stuff tends to sort of splurge over the top onto the gums or you end swallowing a lot of it. So if you get ones that are specifically made to your mouth whilst they are an investment, you can have them for years and they just work a lot better.

Joanna Fleming:
I've got those molds, but I just wasn't sure if I could use them with the same product. So maybe I'll try using my actual proper molds with the HiSmile stuff and see if it makes a difference. Okay. I'm going to try that. I wasn't sure if I could, but.

Hannah Furst:
When my mom got her teeth whitening done, she started, I go to her place and I'd see her and she'd be sitting on the couch with a straw in a wine glass.

Madeleine Duff:
Yes.

Hannah Furst:
Like she was so paranoid about it, that she would like be drinking her wine out of a straw. Do people do that or is that just my crazy mother?

Madeleine Duff:
Yes, I do that.

Hannah Furst:
So dentists do that?

Madeleine Duff:
Yeah. So look, I think it depends, if you've been whitening your teeth, your teeth just become a little bit more porous for the first couple of days afterwards, so they're more likely to soak up stains. So if you've been doing take home whitening, I say avoid coffee, avoid red wine anything that would stain a white t-shirt, so spaghetti bolognese anything like that. Avoid that for two days after you've whitened. But if you want to maintain the results, drinking wine through a straw, it's not a bad idea.

Joanna Fleming:
That is a good tip. I'm now starting to think maybe I should be drinking my tea through a straw.

Madeleine Duff:
You could, just don't burn yourself.

Joanna Fleming:
Yeah. Okay. I'll try not to. Are there any dangers that are associated with teeth whitening? Are there any negative side effects? I know that when I've had teeth whitening done before I've had like that blanching on my gums, is that quite a common side effect?

Madeleine Duff:
Yeah. And look, that is a side effect. We call it sort of gingival irritation, but it just is where the gums just get a bit irritated. They get a bit red and they can even go a little bit white where the bleach itself actually bleaches the gums. That doesn't last, it'll go away. The mouth heals really quickly, but it can be uncomfortable. So that is one of the risks. The other thing as well, to stop that from happening is don't overload the trays. People just splurge so much with the whitening in there and you really don't need a lot per tooth. So I always say to people, "It's about the size of a grain of quinoa," which is so specific, but that's just exactly how much you need per tooth and then it won't flow over the top of the trays.

Madeleine Duff:
You're not wasting your whitening and then you're not getting that gingival irritation anywhere near as much. Look, the other thing as well is the sensitivity. That's the thing that people sort of find the most. And then of course you don't want to be one of those people that just over bleaches. You shouldn't be doing it every week or every month. I think four to six monthly. If you've got a special event coming in that are coming up, then by all means, you can put them in for a day or so, but you don't want to be over-bleaching your teeth, everything in moderation.

Hannah Furst:
Yes, that's good. See Jo, that's one thing I do do, is I do teeth whitening in moderation.

Madeleine Duff:
Yes.

Joanna Fleming:
Good for you.

Hannah Furst:
I know.

Joanna Fleming:
I'm proud of you.

Hannah Furst:
To be honest, it's because I forget. But usually it's like every three or four months.

Joanna Fleming:
I did want to ask about when I do my teeth whitening for, when I take the strips off, sometimes there'll be like whiter parts on my teeth. What is that? Why does that happen? And then the next day it's gone.

Madeleine Duff:
Yeah. So mostly if it goes away the next day, it's that dehydration that we're talking about so as the teeth get dehydrated, they just get that chalky appearance. The other thing is some people just naturally in their teeth have different colors and different textures. And so if you've got sort of slightly little brown spots in your teeth, and then you go to whiten your teeth, you'll see people have this sort of mottle effect on their teeth.

Madeleine Duff:
If they go in and just start whitening, sometimes those little mottled areas can actually end up quite chalky and stay chalky. So that's where if you've got that sort of enamel, it's always worthwhile coming in and sort of seeing your dentist because there's certain pre-treatments that we can do to prevent that from happening for you. Yeah. That's another reason why it's, I'm not trying to sort of spruce dentists too much here. That is another reason why it's good to have someone who knows what they're looking at have a look at you before you start.

Joanna Fleming:
Yeah. I was kind of thinking that it was like hair. You know when you go blonde and some areas are a little bit more porous and like the color picks up more in one area, that's kind of what I thought it was like.

Madeleine Duff:
Yeah. It pretty much is. They just become more dehydrated there and then the good thing is, most people it goes away after a couple of days.

Hannah Furst:
With teeth sensitivity, is there anything that you can do if you're experiencing sensitivity from teeth whitening?

Madeleine Duff:
Yeah. So I often say to people, if you're going to start doing some whitening a couple of weeks beforehand, use a sensitive toothpaste when you're brushing your teeth. So that can just sort of build up a bit of reinforcement on the teeth so they can be that little bit less sensitive. You can even use sensitive toothpaste after you've done the whitening. And the other thing that you can get is you can get, it's like a sooth gel, which is a desensitizing gel. So you put that in the trays for 10 minutes before you whiten your teeth and then you put the whitening in and then that can help to stop them from being so sensitive.

Hannah Furst:
What a good tip.

Joanna Fleming:
Oh, where do you get that from?

Madeleine Duff:
From your dentist.

Joanna Fleming:
How much would someone expect to pay? I'm sure there's people listening to this going, "Okay, I get it. I'm meant to go to the dentist, but how much am I going to have to spend to get my teeth whitened?" So what's like the average cost?

Madeleine Duff:
Look, it really varies from dentist to dentist. A lot of people do deals as well on the whitening too. You're looking at least a couple of hundred to get the trays made. And then a bit more than that to...

Hannah Furst:
It's worth it. That's cheap.

Madeleine Duff:
Yeah. And look, I've had my trays I think for about 10 years and I'm still using them. So, they last a long time if you look after them.

Joanna Fleming:
See, I'm worried my teeth have moved.

Madeleine Duff:
Yeah. And look that is the thing, if the teeth move, they don't necessarily fit anymore. But yeah, I've kept mine in a box for 10 years and they work great. It saves. It is an investment.

Hannah Furst:
Okay. Yep. All right. It's a longterm investment guys. Go to the dentist, get your teeth whitened and then you can maintain it at home.

Madeleine Duff:
Exactly.

Joanna Fleming:
Awesome. Well, thank you so much for joining us Madeleine to talk all things teeth whitening. I'm sure everybody that requested that topic will be very satisfied with that segment. So there you go everyone, go to your local dentist. You can see Madeleine at Toorak Fine Dentistry.

Madeleine Duff:
That's great. Thank you so much girls.

Joanna Fleming:
Product we didn't know we needed it, Hannah. You've got a good one today. I am looking forward to hearing what you have to say about this.

Hannah Furst:
I do. As we all know, I got my makeup done for my first thing that I did back out of lockdown. So a makeup artist came over. Her name's Talia and she did my makeup and she gave me all these amazing tips for minimizing the appearance of pores with makeup. Now, I just want to say that you can't get rid of your pores, you can't shrink your pores. You can't open them or close them. They're not a muscle, so you can't get rid of them, but there's some amazing products out there that can help when you're doing your makeup for a special event or for a wedding or whatever it is. It smooths out the skin to give that kind of Joanna skin-like appearance.

Joanna Fleming:
Is that in the dictionary now?

Hannah Furst:
Yeah. So instead of pore minimizing, we're going to call it Joanna-like skin. I actually day to day don't give a shit about my pores like I don't look at them and go, I don't really care. But if I have a special event on, I kind of do put a bit more effort in with my makeup. So anyway, what we've done is we, Shanti who works in the marketing team, her and I, we both have oily skin. We had such a fun time. We recorded a YouTube video about like we used, I used all the tips that Talia gave me and we made a YouTube video. And it has like before and afters and it has our top products and the hero product of that video, which I want to talk about today was the cosmetics, Bye Bye Pores. I cannot believe I haven't spoken about this before.

Joanna Fleming:
This is a powder, yes?

Hannah Furst:
Yeah. So it is a translucent powder. It comes in a loose powder form or it comes in a pressed powder form. I think the press powder is good just for your handbag for touch ups during the day. But it's basically like a pore filling powder. It really, really, really does. Like it smooths out the skin.

Joanna Fleming:
I remember you trying this in the office just before we all went into lockdown and we went home.

Hannah Furst:
Yes.

Joanna Fleming:
You tried this I think sitting at your desk and we had a box of the product and you're like, "I'm going to try this on my face," and you used it and I was like, "Whoa, that really does work."

Hannah Furst:
And that was without makeup I'm pretty sure we did it with nothing on because you can do it with nothing on. But anyway, go and check out the YouTube video. We'll put a link in the episode notes and if you have oily skin and you kind of... Oh, it was so funny. I remembered back in the day I used to go to a place I will not name and I used to buy this like $15, very, very oily foundation. This is how far I've come. It was a brand called, can you beep this out, Matthew? It's a brand called...

Joanna Fleming:
Oh yes. Yeah.

Hannah Furst:
It was like $15 and it was like the dewiest foundation.

Joanna Fleming:
That's unusual for that age bracket because I feel like when I was a teenager, it was all about matte.

Hannah Furst:
No, this was like a very dewy skin foundation and when we speak about this on the YouTube video about how I used to put that on, no powder, no primer, no skincare, nothing. And I used to just hope for the best. It was like I poured oil on my face afterwards. Like it was so, like I thought I looked good, I don't know why.

Joanna Fleming:
But that's good that you thought you looked good. It only matters what you think anyway.

Hannah Furst:
It totally does. But it's just interesting now with all of the knowledge that I've gotten from makeup artists over the last couple of years, how different the techniques that I use now for my makeup. Like, and so anyway, this video has a four step process for how to minimize the appearance of your pores.

Joanna Fleming:
You know how I knew that you had been in there filming?

Hannah Furst:
How did you know?

Joanna Fleming:
Because I walked in there to film a YouTube video this week and it was a mess and I was like "Hannah's definitely been here because there's shit all over the table." I was like, "This is a classic Hannah like messy."

Hannah Furst:
Classic. Imagine, I think Jo's worst nightmare would be to hot desk with me.

Joanna Fleming:
Yes, absolutely.

Hannah Furst:
We used to sit next to each other and I used to, like my stuff would encroach on your desk and I just could tell how frustrated you were with me.

Joanna Fleming:
We're just like opposites in that sense.

Hannah Furst:
So opposite. Now I love this product you've chosen because I've got one on my desk right now.

Joanna Fleming:
Yes, so do I. I've got it in my hands right now. Can you pronounce this brand name for me because you're so good at French?

Hannah Furst:
Compagnie de Provence.

Joanna Fleming:
Oh yeah. Okay. It's the Shea hand cream by the brand that Hannah just mentioned. So this hand cream has obviously, as the name suggests, has Shea butter in it. It's also got vitamin A and vitamin C.

Joanna Fleming:
The smell of this is just divine. I feel like it's got a little bit of floral, but also a little bit of caramel. I don't know. How would Michael Edwards the fragrance expert explain this?

Hannah Furst:
It does actually say here, you're right Jo, "Soothing floral fragrance with delicate notes of white flowers over a sweet must scent."

Joanna Fleming:
Oh, okay. So I'm a fragrance connoisseur.

Hannah Furst:
You totally are.

Joanna Fleming:
It is a really beautiful hand cream.

Hannah Furst:
Yeah.

Joanna Fleming:
It's really hydrating. I find it's really nice on my cuticles as well, which I struggle with hand creams. I feel like they're not that hydrating on the cuticles.

Hannah Furst:
If you take any photos of your hands, I always put this on first.

Joanna Fleming:
Yes. I always put my OPI, but if you're sending hand pics, I don't know why I'd be doing that. I always put cuticle oil and then hand cream on after I've done my manicure and it's just divine. I'm just obsessed with the smell of it. I'm going to have to re-purchase this because I'm going through it pretty quickly. But anyway, that's mine. It's a hand cream.

Hannah Furst:
Very nice.

Joanna Fleming:
Any memes this week?

Hannah Furst:
Any memes. I have a couple.

Joanna Fleming:
Do you save them for the podcast?

Hannah Furst:
I just save them for myself, but then they come up. I have one here. So, this is me. I miss traveling so much. Every night I pack up my emotional baggage and fly first class to wine country. I thought that was cute.

Joanna Fleming:
That is really you.

Hannah Furst:
Your thirties. Expectation: Killing it in my career, owning a home, starting a family. Reality: Is that a chin hair? That sums up it seriously.

Joanna Fleming:
Oh my god, that couldn't be more you. Where did you find that? Did you make that?

Hannah Furst:
I do not own a home. I have not started a family. I actually looked in the mirror today as I was going out to buy my lunch. I had the biggest rogue chin hair and mustache hair. Like one each and I was like, they were so long and dark. I was like...

Joanna Fleming:
You told me the other day I had a mustache, which I do, but I don't really care.

Hannah Furst:
It's not visible to the naked eye, but it's there.

Joanna Fleming:
But up close and under a very bright light. Yes, it is there. Anyhow.

Hannah Furst:
Bye.

Joanna Fleming:
Bye.

Hannah Furst:
Thanks everyone for joining us today.

Joanna Fleming:
Don't forget to subscribe and tell your friends. It helps other people to discover us and also we really want to know what you thought about this podcast so if you can leave us a review, that would be much appreciated.