Scared of Bright Eyeshadow? I Was Too, Until I Learnt This Easy 3-Step Hack in Lockdown

Hannah Bright EyeshadowHannah Bright Eyeshadow

When I was young, I used to sleep over at my grandparents house every week.

Their home was filled with art and sculptures. My grandpa, who loved a good story, told me that at night, one particularly frightening sculpture turned into the Bogeyman. 

The other day, I realised EYESHADOW is my adult version of the Bogeyman. 

I've always been terrified of eyeshadow, and working in the beauty industry only made it worse. Why? Because I started watching YouTubers doing incredibly elaborate eye looks under the title of “SIMPLE, EASY EYESHADOW FOR BEGINNERS”. 

Get eyeshadow tips from a pro makeup artist in this episode of the Beauty IQ Uncensored podcast below!

I even used to get really self conscious doing my makeup in front of my Beauty IQ Uncensored co-host Joanna, so we decided to record an Instagram Live where she would take me through the absolute basics, including eyeshadow. 

(This video is the perfect place to start if you are a complete beauty newbie and want to nail the absolute basics first, before we upgrade to coloured eyeshadow.)

Then, lockdown hit and I rediscovered the light, bright side of beauty.

I started playing around with eyeshadow outside of my usual repertoire of a blended matte bronze eye. Pink, gold, glitter, orange, red… You name it, I tried it.

In my darkest days of lockdown, when I hadn’t had any non-virtual social contact in days, a bold eye would instantly lift my mood.

My Eyeshadow Journey, A Visual Essay.

Hannah Bright EyeshadowHannah Bright Eyeshadow

With way too much free time on my hands in lockdown, I decided to confront my bright eyeshadow Bogeyman.

I started with M.A.C COSMETICS Powder Kiss Soft Matte Eye Shadowin Werk Werk Werk - a bold red eyeshadow. Just to ease into it.

My first attempt looked like I had developed a rash around my eye. But it didn’t matter… it was for my eyes only. And no, I’m not going to apologise for that terrible pun.

But I kept practicing and viola! (Exhibit A above.)

Then, when I felt confident enough, I upgraded to the beauty YouTuber’s best friend… The Eyeshadow Palette.

Below, I'm wearing a soft orange shade called Tequila Sunrise from the ICONIC London Day To Slay Palette, which worked perfectly with my fave lippy, M.A.C COSMETICS Powder Kiss Liquid Lipcolour in A Little Tamed.

Hannah Bright EyeshadowHannah Bright Eyeshadow

Next, it was time to kick my Bogeyman in the bits and 100 per cent commit to colour.

My weapon of choice? The M.A.C Cosmetics M·A·C Art Library: It's Designerpalette, using the shade Bright Pink.

I matched the bold, neon shadow with the M.A.C COSMETICS Powder Kiss Liquid Lipcolour in Fall In Love, a bright, creamy fuchsia colour.

BAM.

Hannah Bright EyeshadowHannah Bright Eyeshadow

Oh, and then I went totally rogue and slapped on glitter five minutes before I had to do an Instagram Live.

Pfft. Bogeyman, who?

I'm wearing the shade If It Ain't Baroque from the same MAC palette in this photo below.

Hannah Bright EyeshadowHannah Bright Eyeshadow

How to Do Eyeshadow for Beginners.

I hope this inspires anyone who is equally as terrified of coloured eyeshadow to give it a go.

Now, allow me to share a three-step method for easy coloured eyeshadow that is *actually* easy.

Step 1: Choose your eyeshadow.

If you’re just getting started experimenting with colour, I would recommend the M.A.C Cosmetics M·A·C Art Library: It's Designer palette. The shades are highly pigmented and they blend beautifully.

Step 2: Prime your eyelid.

I always start with a primer - I use Heir Atelier Eye Primer .17oz. but you can also use your concealer.

Applying a base of eye primer or concealer before adding shadow will intensify the colour and help it last longer.

Step 3: Just apply the bloody eyeshadow.

Now for the fun part.

Pack the eyeshadow colour onto your eyelid with your finger - doing this prevents fallout (flecks of eyeshadow powder falling from your lid to under your eye).

Then, blend out the edges using a fluffy brush. The best starter eyeshadow brush set is the Designer Brands Melodrama 10 Piece Brush Set

I recorded a YouTube video to take fellow beauty newbies through my fail-proof coloured eyeshadow tutorial. Am I a beauty YouTuber yet?

A Final Note on Bright Makeup...

Finally, I just want to say that colour is for ANY AGE. Stuff traditional beauty rules.

My mum wears blue eyeliner, and has done so for 40 years.

(Thanks to me, though, she has discovered the fancy shmancy technology of MAKE UP FOR EVER Aqua Resist Color Pencil, which lasts up to 24 hours and is smudge, sweat and water-proof. After 40 years, she no longer has smudged blue eyeliner at 3pm.)

So, go forth and have fun with colour.

And as the wonderfully wise makeup artist Ross Andrewartha always says, "There’s no rules with makeup. Just have fun with it, babes."

Here Are All the Products Mentioned in This Article:

Want more banger beauty recommendations? Check out these stories below!


Want to learn more? Here's the transcript of our Beauty IQ Uncensored podcast episode on beginner's eyeshadow.

    

We chat to Dr Lucinda about PMS. Plus one of our fave makeup artist buddies, Carla Dyson, gives us her best beginner eyeshadow tips.

Beauty IQ Uncensored Episode 63 Transcript - 'Eyeshadow Tips From A Pro Makeup Artist'

    

 

Hannah Furst:
Welcome everybody to Beauty IQ key the podcast.

Joanna Flemming:
I'm your host, Joanna Flemming.

Hannah Furst:
And I am your co-host Hannah Furst.

Joanna Flemming:
What happened?

Hannah Furst:
Oh my God. I'm so puffed out. That was Ben and Jerry's delivering all my half baked.

Joanna Flemming:
Oh, Hannah had an actual panic attack on the phone to me.

Hannah Furst:
Oh my God.

Joanna Flemming:
She was like, "Oh my God I've just let somebody into the building. I've just left somebody ..." And I'm like, "Hang up and go and deal with it."

Hannah Furst:
It was just staff from Ben and Jerry's [inaudible 00:00:30] delivering all this. Sorry, as you may have remembered I was manifesting Ben and Jerry's Half Baked. Anyway, they sent me a message and they've delivered me...

Joanna Flemming:
That's very generous. Thank you to Ben and Jerry's our new sponsor, unofficial.

Hannah Furst:
Hey Ben and Jerry's is like $100. It's actually really expensive.

Joanna Flemming:
I know. I'm not even joking, that's an amazing alignment for you.

Hannah Furst:
I know. I'm pretty happy about that. Anyway, I actually wanted to do a bit of call-out, if any of our listeners live in Byron Bay and want to take me out for like a night out-

Joanna Flemming:
Yeah, hang out with Hannah she doesn't have any friends up there.

Hannah Furst:
I don't know anyone and so I'm looking for friends. If you have a brother that you want to set me up with, I would be totally down for that too. I'm having a really tough time choosing clothes because obviously. As I've mentioned on these podcasts, as many of you in Victoria would have experienced, I [inaudible 00:01:24]. 80% of my wardrobe doesn't fit me and then I've bought some new clothes so I'm taking up all the clothes that fit me. And then I've given mom a box of clothes to ship up to me when and if they ever fit me again. So what is on today's episode, Joanna?

Joanna Flemming:
So on today's episode, we have our favourite and only resident JP Dr. Lucinda joining us to talk about PMS. And we are also speaking to another very good friend of ours, Carla Dyson about beginner's eyeshadows so that's going to be a really good chat and our products we didn't know we needed. So as we said in our intro, our favourite and only resident JP, Dr. Lucinda is joining us today.

Dr Lucinda Raudaschl:
Oh my gosh.

Joanna Flemming:
Welcome back.

Hannah Furst:
Hey, before we start any upgrades on your dating life or should we wait till the end?

Dr Lucinda Raudaschl:
We can start wherever you want.

Hannah Furst:
Have you been on any really bad online date?

Dr Lucinda Raudaschl:
I don't think anything beats that one dude who had the multiple people in one barbecue setting. I think that's going to be a difficult one to beat to be honest. I haven't had any terrible ones.

Hannah Furst:
Great.

Dr Lucinda Raudaschl:
No, but I've just had a couple of just normal human being dates. Currently, seeing this one guy.

Hannah Furst:
Oh you're seeing someone?

Dr Lucinda Raudaschl:
Yeah. I don't even know what dating really is in this generation, guys. I constantly have these conversations with people where it's just like, "Do I bring up a thing where we say, is this a thing? Or are we like, are you seeing anyone else? Or how do I bring this up?" But it's like, there's whole forums on how to do it in the most cool fashion. Unlike, I've got all these people asking me to go on dates with them, do I say that no or what are you doing?

Hannah Furst:
I think that's the best way to do it, when I was 20 and I said to this guy I was dating and I really, really liked him and I really wanted him to be my boyfriend. So I said to him, I was like, "I was at a party and someone was hitting on me, what should I do?" And he was like, "Um," I probably wouldn't do that now but that was how I used to play games as a 20 year old.

Dr Lucinda Raudaschl:
I think now you could just be like, "Yo, is this a thing?" Or like...

Hannah Furst:
Is this a thing? Yeah. I've grown up.

Joanna Flemming:
So today's topic that we are meant to be talking about is PMS. Now, can we start with discussing what does PMS stand for?

Dr Lucinda Raudaschl:
Yeah. So PMS is premenstrual syndrome. So it's something where ... people have probably heard of the word PMS and associating it with like, oh my gosh, I'm a bit moody right now. Essentially it's related to the way in which our hormones change during our menstrual cycle and how sensitive we are to it. Mainly so the progesterone and oestrogen hormones are the ones of which they believe that seem to be the problem here.

Dr Lucinda Raudaschl:
So if we take, for example, day one of our cycle as being when we start having the period, day 14 or halfway through is generally when we're ovulating and releasing an egg. It appears to be that time period up through until we have our period and/or when we finish [inaudible 00:04:33] seems to be the time where we're more sensitive to the hormonal changes. So, yeah, it can lead to a couple of different symptoms like bit of road rage, that's more my thing.

Joanna Flemming:
Got road rage, 24/7 so...

Dr Lucinda Raudaschl:
Excellent. And then being a little bit more emotional or just being a bit depressed, crying, hungry and just having some abdominal symptoms or breast tenderness, those type of things. But it's generally not anything like really too severe but effects quite a few people can fix, like 30 to 80% of women.

Hannah Furst:
I usually get a little bit more like, I don't know what's wrong with me in the wake up to my period. And then I don't realise because I'm on the pill. So then I see my pill packet and I say that I'm like a week out. I'm like, "Oh, that's why I was feeling like not myself." Or like I might have overreacted to something or, yeah, I don't know. I noticed that it's in that timeframe and then I'm good. After that, I'm fine.

Joanna Flemming:
But can things like the pill regulate PMS? Because obviously they're regulating your hormones.

Dr Lucinda Raudaschl:
Yeah. It's because it stops you from ovulating, that's the theory. It gives you a continuous flow of hormonal levels to prevent that fluctuation. So that's one treatment, if it's something that's really troubling. So I think that's something that you guys mentioned before the premenstrual dysphoric disorder or PMDD. Now that is a whole other level of symptoms severity. So it's a really severe form of PMS and it's something that's not talked about enough. Is that something that you guys have heard about much before, or?

Joanna Flemming:
Yeah. I've heard about it but I don't really know anything about it in detail. So can you tell us a little bit about what those symptoms would be compared to PMS?

Dr Lucinda Raudaschl:
Yeah, sure. So those are the kind of patients I would see coming in saying, "There's a time in the month where I don't even recognise myself. Like I just want to kill my husband." It is so bad and no one knows what's going on. Some patients can even be misdiagnosed with even things like bipolar disorder, it is so severe. So it's a condition where it has a dramatic impact on your life. So you get really severe depression or anxiety or agitation, anger, irritability, major mood swings. And it's not something that is something that you can control in that sense very easily.

Dr Lucinda Raudaschl:
And then obviously from PMS, like physical symptoms as well. So like really bad abdominal pains, bloating, breast tenderness, aches and pains everywhere, trouble sleeping. And it just really has a dramatic effect and that can affect about five to 10% of women.

Hannah Furst:
How does that even get diagnosed if you've already got mental health concerns like anxiety or depression? How do you differentiate that from PMDD?

Dr Lucinda Raudaschl:
Yeah. Very, very good question. So something that is very helpful because you can't actually diagnose PMDD with a blood test because actually the progesterone and oestrogen hormones are normal. It's just you're hypersensitive to it, that's the theory behind how this works. So we'll do blood tests to make sure it's nothing else like a thyroid disorder, things like that. When it comes to mental health, it's a different kind of history.

Dr Lucinda Raudaschl:
So doing a symptom diary for about two to three months is really, really helpful. You can easily download those online or there's those period diaries that you can download as an app, if that's easier for you as well and then you can go through that with your GP or gyno, anything like that. They should be able to help you diagnose because it's normally something that would occur for up to two weeks of the month. Some patients are really, really unlucky and they can just experience it all the time and that's obviously a little bit trickier to diagnose it but that's really rare. So it's more so like certain times of the month there is a pattern to it.

Hannah Furst:
How do you treat something like that if it's period related? Because like, can you go on antianxiety medication or anything like that?

Dr Lucinda Raudaschl:
Yeah, totally. There's three main kinds of treatments from a medication point of view, alongside as you can imagine psychological therapy or help from a mental health professional, that's really important. So being on the pill is a really good idea because like we said earlier, it can regulate your hormonal levels to try and hopefully help stop that ovulation and stop the fluctuation in your hormones. Then also vitamin B6, so that's some evidence for that.

Dr Lucinda Raudaschl:
It seems like studies are showing that 100 milligrammes per day seems to be the treatment. And then lastly, like you were mentioning about antianxiety or antidepressants, like SSRIs. The thing is with those treatments ... because people get really freaked out when you start mentioning antidepressants. Because there's a big stigma towards it where there really, really shouldn't be like just touching on that aspect in total with using antidepressants.

Dr Lucinda Raudaschl:
It's a matter of, we need to start seeing it as any other kind of physical condition where if you can imagine if you've got a lack in a certain vitamin or if you've got ... or like for example, insulin and diabetes, you need to replace that. And that's what antidepressants do, they help replace say for example, the serotonin levels that you're lacking. So people shouldn't stigmatise it too much like I'm weak, I need this or I've got something seriously wrong with me.

Dr Lucinda Raudaschl:
So for example with PMDD, so you can use it continuous, antidepressants or you can even use it just in day 14 to your period time. So from ovulation to period, so it can be cyclical or yeah, so it doesn't have to be continuous, that helps people feel a bit better about it. So, yeah. So those are the main medication kind of things that we tend to use.

Hannah Furst:
I don't think that I've ever experienced PMS, but do you think that PMS, if you get other ... so I don't get cramps, I don't get any other symptoms.

Dr Lucinda Raudaschl:
Amazing.

Joanna Flemming:
Hannah's period just surprises her out of nowhere.

Hannah Furst:
Yeah, it just surprises me out of nowhere and I have no-

Dr Lucinda Raudaschl:
I can't handle this.

Hannah Furst:
... but what I would say is that when I was younger, like the only time that I've ever felt my hormones affect my mood was when I was a teenager because I was an angry, asshole teenager. I was the worst. My parents just couldn't even handle me. Once I grew out of my teenage years I never experienced moods, mood swings.

Joanna Flemming:
You kind of made up for it afterwards.

Hannah Furst:
[crosstalk 00:11:10] yeah, I think my moods just ...

Dr Lucinda Raudaschl:
On that note actually, because I think you're often told as ... and I used to hate these when men would say this to me in past relationships like, "Oh, you must be getting your period because you crack the sheets over something," or whatever it is. It's just like-

Hannah Furst:
Yeah [inaudible 00:11:30].

Dr Lucinda Raudaschl:
Yeah but it's also just invalidating your emotions around that time. There shouldn't be anything wrong with feeling that way. It puts a shame on you for your own hormones, like playing tricks on you, I guess, which is just a really bad way of feeling about it.

Joanna Flemming:
It's so, so true. And everyone won't take those comments differently as well, isn't it? Because you can be feeling really emotional and you're actually nowhere near.

Hannah Furst:
I'm a little bit worried that I'm not normal. Like what's wrong with me? Why don't I-

Dr Lucinda Raudaschl:
No you don't want to go there. You don't want to start [crosstalk 00:12:04].

Joanna Flemming:
Like I'll start crying.

Dr Lucinda Raudaschl:
... at random stuff, man. I saw a dead pigeon and I just started crying for it. And I was just like, "I've got an issue right now but it's okay, I will embrace." Yeah, I guess there's other things like other natural methods of treating things. I know on a different episode when we were talking about our bowels and periods and stuff, people can have a look at that episode again because that's something that's quite common where you can adjust your diet.

Dr Lucinda Raudaschl:
If you're getting those kind of PMS symptoms like avoiding triggering foods, like caffeine, sugar and spicy stuff for increasing your water intake and improving your sleep, like reducing stress levels. But also things like you always see those PMS medications like the horrible ones. Like [inaudible 00:12:50] oil like that stuff ... We've done studies for it and they've showed that it's not technically more effective than a placebo.

Dr Lucinda Raudaschl:
If you're going to go and experiment into any of those horrible medications what I would totally recommend is having a chat with the chemist, make sure that you're not on any sort of medications that will interact with that. Or obviously your GP as well, make sure that you're fit and healthy for it. But I think the main thing here is that if you are feeling that you're getting any serious symptoms that are affecting you or the way in which other people are reacting to you at that time, please just make sure you go and see your doctor. Because like there is treatment out there and no one should need to suffer. That is really vital and yeah.

Joanna Flemming:
Yeah. I think that's a really important point because we've had a conversation before about endometriosis as well. A lot of women go through their period every single month thinking that their symptoms are normal when actually they're not entirely normal and there is something that could be underlying or something that you can do about it to make your periods an easier time of the month. So that's a really good point that you make there. Well, thank you so much for joining us for yet another chat. I'm sure we'll have you back again soon.

Dr Lucinda Raudaschl:
Pleasure. Yeah, sounds great.

Joanna Flemming:
But it's always fun to chat to you. Hopefully next time you join us, you've got like a boyfriend announcement or something [crosstalk 00:14:18].

Dr Lucinda Raudaschl:
Oh, I don't know. I'm so scared guys I don't know.

Joanna Flemming:
I won't jinx it.

Dr Lucinda Raudaschl:
Yeah. We'll see how this goes.

Joanna Flemming:
Thanks Dr. Lucinda.

Dr Lucinda Raudaschl:
All right. Thanks guys, take care and have a great day.

Joanna Flemming:
So I'd said in the intro that we were going to be joined today by a very good friend of ours. I was probably overselling it a little bit Carla because we've probably only met a handful of times in person, but-

Hannah Furst:
I feel like we're friends.

Carla Dyson:
We are friends.

Hannah Furst:
Every time we leave, like seeing you we're like, "Oh, how good's Carla?"

Carla Dyson:
That's so sweet.

Hannah Furst:
Just want to be besties with Carla.

Joanna Flemming:
Yeah. So we're joined by makeup artist Carla Dyson today. You've probably found her on Instagram. She's an absolute wizard when it comes to makeup. So we thought that this would be a great chance for us to chat to you about beginner's eyeshadow. So let's start off with what the beginners actually need to know about eyeshadow.

Carla Dyson:
Well I think the first thing I would say is that it's not as daunting as you might think. I think a lot of people get so freaked out by eyeshadow and think I have no idea where to start. I even meet models, they get their makeup done every day professionally and I always think they must know what they're doing, they must pick things up along the way. But people get so scared of it and just think, "Oh no, it's just not something I would ever do." I think it's all about having the right products and tools because they make your life so much easier.

Joanna Flemming:
No, I fully agree with that because friends of mine have said, "No, I could never do eyeshadow myself. Every time I do it, it looks like I've got a bruised eye or something," but it really does make a difference when you've got a good eyeshadow colour and a good brush.

Carla Dyson:
And a good brush, that's it. And trying to blend with the wrong brush, if you don't know what you're doing. I wouldn't even be able to do it with 12 years experience, so there's no way someone that's just starting out could do it. So you definitely need the right products and the right tools as a start. So I think the first thing to determine is your eye shape. Because if you see something that you love on Instagram or YouTube or whatever, however you find your inspiration or a celebrity even, you might look at them and be like, "Oh my God, I want to try this," but your eye shape's completely different to that person. So then you need to seek inspiration from people that either have a similar look to you or a similar eye shape, eye colour. So yeah, it's quite overwhelming, there's quite a lot but just start practising and determine your own eye shape and work from there. I think that's the number one thing.

Joanna Flemming:
Yeah. Give it a crack is a good place to start.

Carla Dyson:
Give it a crack.

Hannah Furst:
You did do that tutorial of your wedding makeup and it was the sped up IGTV. I think I've watched that ... not to sound stalker-ish. I've probably watched it 30 times and I'm like, "But how does she do it?" I still can't get my head around it. It was the best make up I've ever seen.

Carla Dyson:
Oh, thanks. It's a good job I wore it on my wedding day, right?

Joanna Flemming:
Yeah, it really was stunning.

Hannah Furst:
You did your own makeup on your wedding day, it looked phenomenal.

Carla Dyson:
Thanks.

Hannah Furst:
Anyway, that was a bit off topic because the next question is, do we really need to use an eye primer before eyeshadow and what does it actually do?

Carla Dyson:
Yes. So I think 100% yes. So it's almost like doing a blush without foundation. So it would be patchy and hard to blend so 100% you need an eye primer. The only time I would not use a primer is for instance, if you just go into work or something. Like you don't have to be that extra every day. Definitely if you're working on Zoom or something, there's no need. But if you've got a wedding or you've got an event or just anything really, you want it to be lasting. And there's so many reasons which I'll go through why you need to be prime in your eyes.

Carla Dyson:
It's basically the prep of the eye area. So if you just go straight on to a naked eyelid, you might have really oily eyelids, which you wouldn't really know about. So you're going to get creasing and smudging and it's a mess if you don't prep the eye area properly. It also absorbs the oil. So if you do have a lot of oil throughout the day, it will absorb that and stop it from creasing, which is the number one thing. It also intensifies your eye shadow. So if you're not using one, like I say and you might think of this eyeshadow as rubbish, it doesn't have any colour payoff. But if you put a good primer on underneath, it grabs the product and intensifies it and it keeps it there all day. So it's just a no-brainer for me. I just feel like priming the eye is like priming the skin and you can't not do that.

Joanna Flemming:
Until I discovered an eye primer I thought every eyeshadow was [inaudible 00:18:39].

Carla Dyson:
Yeah, that's it.

Joanna Flemming:
Because I was like, "Why isn't it lasting on my eyes?"

Carla Dyson:
Exactly. And the other thing is you can even get coloured ones, like paint pots from MAC, you can get those and they come in a massive range of colours and it kills two birds with one stone. You don't need to do that and then loads of eyeshadow, you can just literally put that one coloured product on.

Joanna Flemming:
And when it comes to power shadows, which kind of brushes should everyone have in your opinion?

Carla Dyson:
Well I love fluffy brushes and I can't look past MAC 217. I've probably got 50 of them in my kit under my personal collection as well but they are the ultimate blending brush. And there's obviously those other options, there's crown brushes do a ... I don't know what that one's called. I think it's pro blend or something. It's just a fluffy white brush basically. I just think without that, like I said tools again, you simply can't blend an eyeshadow. Like, it's so fluffy and it's dense enough to do the job and for the placement to be right. It doesn't go everywhere. It's not like you're using a powder brush on your eyes but it's just, yeah, enough to get that seamless application. I also think a bullet brush or a pencil brush, there's different names for it.

Carla Dyson:
That is like a smaller denser version of the [fluffier 00:19:54] brush like a 217. And so that is perfect for under the eye. I think it's always important to mirror what you've done on the top lid. A lot of people that are so scared of doing eye shadow leave underneath the eye and I think it looks so top heavy. It's daunting, it is, because obviously you might have dark circles under the eye so you think, "Oh my God, I don't want to do a dark smokiness underneath the eye because it's going to make my dark circles look worse," and it will as long as you've covered your dark circles then you've got a blank canvas and you do need to mirror up what you've done on the top otherwise it's going to look so top heavy.

Hannah Furst:
And if you're not having any luck, with powder shadows and finding it too tricky to master can cream or liquid eyeshadows be a better option and have you got any faves?

Carla Dyson:
Yeah, so I absolutely love cream shadows. I actually use a cream shadow on most clients. I think they blend seamlessly, I actually found them really easy to do for a beginner. So I would advise cream shadows and you can literally put it on with your finger and then just buff out the edges. I've got so many favourites. I know that there's Armani, I've got some of those in my kit and also I do love to even just wetting your brush with a firmer, more defining brush you can apply any kind of eye shadow. So if it is a powder eyeshadow, you can just dampen your brush and then create your own cream, which I absolutely love to do. And there's also a product on the market, I think it's Make Up For Ever Aqua Seal, is it?

Hannah Furst:
Yes.

Carla Dyson:
Aqua Seal.

Hannah Furst:
Yeah.

Carla Dyson:
Yeah, so that you can actually drop into powders as well or pigments and just make them really intense and it does stop fall out. So it's so much better for people that are afraid of having all that fall out underneath their eyes. It's just so much easier. I'm a massive fan of cream shadows so I would definitely say yes to that one.

Hannah Furst:
And let's say that you're on the go and you've accidentally left an eyeshadow palette out of your makeup bag or you've gone on holidays or something, you want to wear an eyeshadow, what other products can double as eyeshadow?

Carla Dyson:
I'm a massive fan of this. So I use a bronzer pretty much every day on my eyes. So I think that it's nice to create that monochromatic kind of look. So if I've got that same bronze on my skin then ... I've been known to just squish my powder brush if I've chucked it in the car and I've only got one brush with me and I'm like, "What am I going to do?" I'll just squish it so that it's a little bit more eye shaped and then brush it over my eyelid with whatever's left on there.

Carla Dyson:
But obviously I don't really advise that but it's there as an option if you're desperate. I just think, yeah, bronzer 100%. You can either have matte ones and just dust it over the eye and you can even just put it into the eye socket if you just want to add a little bit of dimension and also blush. Blush is a good one to add the slightest bit of colour. So I think a lot of people get a bit scared of using colour. So yeah, just using the same blush colour as you've used on your cheeks and if it's got a bit of shimmer in it, it'll look amazing on the lid and it just makes the eyes pop.

Carla Dyson:
So it might just be that if you've got hazel eyes, so a little bit of green in there, you can use a peachy pinky turn and just wash that over the top and it'll immediately make your eyes pop.

Joanna Flemming:
Hannah loves a pink tone for her eyes.

Carla Dyson:
I love it.

Hannah Furst:
I do. Although now that we're out of lockdown, I've stopped doing it. Because I'm like, "Well now I have to go in public." So now I just want to look pretty. But now I'm like, "Well, I can't go on a first date wearing like a neon pink eye."

Joanna Flemming:
Yeah. It was fun [inaudible 00:23:17] it got us through the last eight months.

Hannah Furst:
Totally, agree with that. Now this one might be a bit controversial, but eyes before base or base before eyes?

Carla Dyson:
Okay, personally, I like base first and that is a bit controversial because a lot of makeup artists actually do the opposite. The reason why I like to do base first is because people have a lot of different colours in their skin and undertones and that even as a makeup artist can actually throw off your colour choices when you're going to do the eye makeup. So if someone's got a lot of redness in the skin, you typically wouldn't go for a pink eye shadow or anything like that because you'd feel like it was just going to make them look too pink overall.

Carla Dyson:
But obviously if they're not pink on their body and you then counteract all that redness that was naturally in the skin you've then got a blank canvas to work on. I just think that that's so much easier. I can already put the blush on and powder the teaser and everything. So you can see what you're working with. And then you've got a broader choice of colours that you can work with to actually work with their skintone or eye colour, hair colour, whatever it might be.

Carla Dyson:
Whereas if you've got a lot of redness and even blemished skin and stuff, it's quite hard to look past that if you've got a lot of redness and blemishes and then you're trying to think what eyeshadow would look good. I think it's definitely better to work with ... Well personally, I think it's better to work with a blank canvas first.

Joanna Flemming:
I think that's how we all learn to do our makeup so it's really hard to reverse that on yourself and be like, "No, I'm going to start with my eyes." Because I've tried to do that. And I'm like, "It just looks weird." And then I can't look at myself as I'm doing my foundation.

Hannah Furst:
That's it. It's almost like you don't know how to ... intents to go either because you're like, "I look like I've been punched in the face," but once you put your bronzer and your contour on everything else on it all falls into place. So personally I would rather do that.

Joanna Flemming:
Now one of our creators, [Desi Boy 00:25:04] did a tutorial on IGTV for us recently. And he used that MAC pigment, I think it's called black brown. And one of our team members El raved about it to me before hand, she couldn't have spoken highly enough of it and I was tempted to buy it. But when I saw him use it, I was like, "I feel like I need to add that to my cart as soon as possible." Can you explain how to use pigment [inaudible 00:25:28]? And what's the best way that people can be applying it? What's the easiest way for beginners to use products like that? That are loose products.

Carla Dyson:
Yeah. Okay. So, again, probably one of the most daunting things to do with eyeshadow say glitter or pigment because they just look like they're going to go everywhere. So first thing is primer, keep your eyes closed when you apply it and whilst it drives and goes tacky. If you open your eye, it's probably going to crease and then whatever product you put on it is going to crease, so keep your eyes closed. And then basically you need a flat fan brush. So it's quite dense, nothing fluffy. If you go fluffy, it's going to end up everywhere, all over the face, all over everything around you.

Hannah Furst:
All over your entire house, you're going to have to burn it down.

Carla Dyson:
Yeah, you're literally ... glitter never leaves. So it will be all over everything you earn for the rest of your life. So just a fam flat brush and just tap off the excess, that's really important. So make sure it goes somewhere else and just basically tap it onto the eye area. You can even do it with a finger, if you're more comfortable with that. And or you do have a lot of tools at home. Also if you're really scared of it and you've already done the base for instance, you do not want to do glitter on top of a freshly amazing base. Put a tissue, so fold the tissue over and put it right under your bottom lash line and then you can press it on and you can have as much fall out as you want because the tissue is going to catch it all anyway.

Hannah Furst:
And if you could only use one pallet or one single eyeshadow on clients for the rest of your life, what would it be?

Carla Dyson:
This is so hard. I think this is the hardest question ever.

Hannah Furst:
I know.

Carla Dyson:
I expected three products but just one is a really tough one. I know we talked [inaudible 00:27:06] a lot, but I actually would have to say possibly pigment because I feel like ... I'll talk about two colours because you've asked me for one product, I've got to tell you two colours. The MAC pigment that I'm absolutely obsessed with is [tan 00:27:19] which I think just is the most amazing bronzy eye look on anyone and it just makes you feel all summery and glowy.

Hannah Furst:
Searching this right now because I want to add it to my cart. Anything-

Carla Dyson:
I love tan.

Hannah Furst:
... that Carla says to buy, eyeshadow wise, I'll buy it.

Carla Dyson:
And the other one is vanilla. So that is also a MAC one. That is what I use on pretty much every client on the inner corner of the eye. So sometimes you want just that little pop of colour, as I said before obviously if you've got wide to eyes, you probably wouldn't want to do that. But for most eye shapes, it's quite flattering to put a little bit of highlight on the inner corner. I just love it, I just think it's got that ... It's the perfect amount of like ... it's neutral but it's got a little bit of Goldie to it and it just catches the light for photo shoots. Other than that, I think it would be a cream product but that's definitely more than one.

Hannah Furst:
You can do one more go on, one more.

Carla Dyson:
I feel like a creamy eye base would be nice. So a shimmery eye pot of some sort like even Charlotte Tilbury's Eyes to Mesmerise, they catch the lights perfectly, absolutely love them. It's just one of those things, I don't think I ever get through a makeup without doing some sort of [Queenie 00:28:31] product. I do want to say as well I feel like there's no real rules when it comes to makeup. Even though we do teach certain things and we give you guidelines, I think realistically, there aren't any rules you can just practise and just see what works.

Carla Dyson:
Because people often say to me, "How can you put a cream blush over the top of foundation that you've already powdered? Or how do you put a cream eyeshadow over the top of powdered eyeshadow?" And I'm like, "Well, you just can," if you know what you're doing and you've practised enough. And like you said before, it's just the tiniest bit on a fluffy brush or on the tip of your finger and just pressing it on top just to add a little bit of dimension when the light hits your face, that's all it is. And yeah, I think people just saying that there's rules sometimes freaks people out. So just have a [inaudible 00:29:15] see what works for your eye [inaudible 00:29:17].

Hannah Furst:
Well if you want to stalk Carla, which I'm sure everybody listening to this will want to do after this interview, you can find her on Instagram it's Carla Dyson Makeup. I'm just going to go and watch your wedding video one more time and I'll pop that link in the episode notes. Thanks so much for joining us today.

Carla Dyson:
Thanks so much for having me.

Joanna Flemming:
Product we didn't know we needed, Hannah, you actually started telling me your product you didn't know you needed while we were recording and I was like, "Save it for the recording."

Hannah Furst:
Yeah. Before I started at Adore Beauty, I'd heard about marula oil because there's some other brands that do marula oil but it's actually quite pricey. So I have found an affordable ... it's 100% coldpress marula oil, it's by the ordinary. And what I really love about this oil is it's really light. It's not like one of those thick oils. You know the oils that just completely absorb into the skin really quickly, this is one of those. My only thing with facial oils is that, because I layer so many serums, I do find that if I put a facial oil over the top it does peel.

Joanna Flemming:
Yes.

Hannah Furst:
So I have a little tip for that. So what I do is I do my moisturiser, I put a few drops into my moisturiser and then I put that onto my face. Like mix it and put it onto my face.

Joanna Flemming:
I taught you that.

Hannah Furst:
Did you?

Joanna Flemming:
Yes.

Hannah Furst:
Oh my God I thought that I-

Joanna Flemming:
[crosstalk 00:30:45].

Hannah Furst:
So Joanna is going to take credit for that little tip, fair enough.

Joanna Flemming:
I will. But also if you don't want to do that as well just change the way that you're ... because I find a lot of people rub an oil in, try putting it in the palms of your hands and then use it, pressing it in together and then pressing it onto the skin as opposed to rubbing it. And don't be tempted once you've pressed it in to then rub because it will peel.

Hannah Furst:
I love robbing a moisturiser in. I've done that pressing thing and I don't like it. It's not how I like to do my skincare.

Joanna Flemming:
If you don't like the feeling of oil on your skin like that dry oil feeling. Then I would definitely recommend mixing in with your moisturiser because you don't get that feeling and that film on the skin afterwards. And it's just like rubbing your moisturiser in.

Hannah Furst:
The other thing that I really like about this is that I find sometimes like oils, they add essential oils and I don't really like too much fragrance. So this has got no smell, no fragrance.

Joanna Flemming:
And also if you're impaired barrier you wouldn't want to be putting essential oils [crosstalk 00:31:46].

Hannah Furst:
No. Exactly. I've been really naughty though. I think I'm re-impairing my barrier by using that recovery serum.

Joanna Flemming:
Oh, Hannah you've come such a long way.

Hannah Furst:
I loved it so much that I put it on two nights in a row and I was like, "Oh-

Joanna Flemming:
Of course you did.

Hannah Furst:
... why did I do that?"

Joanna Flemming:
One of my favourite things about you is how reckless you are.

Hannah Furst:
Anyway. It is a really nice light affordable facial oil and I'm loving particularly with my 30 plus skin at night, I need that extra hydration. That's mine, what's yours?

Joanna Flemming:
So I said to you before we started recording, I was like, "Have I done Lean Screen yet?" And you were like, "No you haven't actually." So I wanted to do Ultra Violette Lean Screen, even though we talk about Ultra Violette way too much. But I started using Lean screen, I wanted to use it for a few weeks before I actually properly reviewed it and decided whether I liked it or not. Because I think sunscreen, you just got to try it a few different ways. You got to try a few different things underneath it, you've got to see how you go with the protective factor.

Joanna Flemming:
As someone as we know with rosacea, this formula is better for sensitive skin types and often more suitable for acne prone skin types as well. So it's good for combo and oily skin or anyone with sensitivities like even eczema prone, it's good for. So this is a physical or mineral formula, so there's no chemical sunscreen filters in here. It's just a zinc formula and it says it's mattifying but to be honest with you, I don't think it is. I don't think it's mattifying because I have normal to dry skin.

Joanna Flemming:
And I find that it gives me a beautiful finish without looking dry or powdery which is what I associate with mattifying. So I think if you've got normal to dry skin and you're worried that it'll baby too, like it'll flatten the dimensions of your face. You know, when you use a really matte product and it just wipes out all dimension and glow in your skin, that's what I was worried it would do but it didn't do that. And it really glides on beautifully for a thicker formula with any physical sunscreen you need or expect it to be a bit thicker than a chemical sunscreen. It's just the way they've got to be formulated.

Joanna Flemming:
But the thing that I really want to point out here is how hard it is to formulate a sunscreen in Australia and for Ultra Violette to be able to produce a sunscreen that is an SPF50+ and a physical formula that actually feels nice on the skin that's like almost impossible. I need to just drive home how hard that is to produce and I did in the early days of using it have a couple of days where I peeled a little bit but that was because of the products I'd used underneath it.

Joanna Flemming:
So if you've bought Lean Screen and you're finding that you're getting a little bit of peeling, just change up what you're using underneath it and see if that eliminates that problem. I also decided to put a moisturiser on underneath and that seemed to completely eradicate any issues with peeling but it'll always come down to what you've got underneath it. I think that's the case with any sunscreen. So there you go, that's mine.

Hannah Furst:
It's a good one.

Joanna Flemming:
Oh, you know how we went out for dinner the other night and I told you that I keep having dreams that I joined a dating app?

Hannah Furst:
Oh yeah. What's that about?

Joanna Flemming:
I don't know. If anyone is a dream interpreter, can you please contact me on Instagram because I want to talk to you.

Hannah Furst:
So you keep dreaming that you're on date, have you got a serious fear about dating apps?

Joanna Flemming:
I think I do. I honestly think I do.

Hannah Furst:
Can I ask you a question?

Joanna Flemming:
Yeah.

Hannah Furst:
Are you too good for dating apps?

Joanna Flemming:
Look I just feel like I don't want to open a can of worms. That's my mindset about it because I've seen ... so another reason that I haven't joined is because I've been watching Clementine Ford's stories and she just posts horror stories of dating apps and I just don't want to even get into that. Also I've seen you have your fair share of experiences with dating apps as well.

Hannah Furst:
Like as soon as I get to Byron, I'll be back on the dating apps for sure.

Joanna Flemming:
Yeah.

Hannah Furst:
I am going to be all over it.

Joanna Flemming:
You know what my plan was though? If I buy a house that's a bit run down, I just need to get on the dating apps and just select tradies and then I can eventually just fully renovate a house via dating apps.

Hannah Furst:
I love that.

Joanna Flemming:
Do we think there's something in that? Could that be a reality TV show?

Hannah Furst:
I feel like that could be the block bachelorette.

Joanna Flemming:
Yes. Oh my God let's pitch that.

Hannah Furst:
Like [World's Align 00:36:14], yeah.

Joanna Flemming:
Let's pitch that to either Channel nine or Channel 10. Yeah, I'd be down for that.

Hannah Furst:
Where you date tradies who then help you renovate your house.

Joanna Flemming:
Yes. Yeah. And then at the end I pick one.

Hannah Furst:
Yeah. I love that pitch and then he moves in.

Joanna Flemming:
Yes. Oh my God, this is such a good ... nobody steal that, if you're listening to this that's our idea.

Hannah Furst:
Don't steal it.

Joanna Flemming:
We're telling you now it's patented.

Hannah Furst:
But I was going to say to the audience, if you have a Byron Bay audience, if you've got a cute brother or friend for me but if you have someone in Melbourne, Jo is single and ready to mingle and is refusing to go on dating apps. So I don't know how well she's going to meet someone because-

Joanna Flemming:
Neither do I.

Hannah Furst:
... no one-

Joanna Flemming:
I've just resigned to the fact that I won't.

Hannah Furst:
... But no one meets IRL Jo so you're going to have to rally the troops and get someone to set you up.

Joanna Flemming:
I know. And it's amazing how much things change in just a matter of years. I was in a long-term relationship and to come out of that and be like, "Oh my God, no one speaks to you in public anymore," this is weird.

Hannah Furst:
Would you do a paid partnership with Bumble? Because I don't know if you saw [inaudible 00:37:13] she's got a really funny Instagram account.

Joanna Flemming:
I did.

Hannah Furst:
She did that live date with Bumble. Would you do a paid partnership with Bumble or is that-

Joanna Flemming:
Yeah, no I'd consider that.

Hannah Furst:
... She'll go on Bumble if you pay her to.

Joanna Flemming:
Yeah.

Hannah Furst:
You don't have to pay me though, I'll do it for free.

Joanna Flemming:
She's already on there for free. Thanks everyone for joining us today. Don't forget to subscribe and tell your friends. It'll help other people to discover us and also we really want to know what you thought about these podcasts so if you can leave us a review that would be much appreciated.